New Publication by Philosophy Professor Andrew J. Cohen

Congratulations to Dr. Andrew J. Cohen, Associate Professor of Philosophy, on the publication of his new book Toleration, published by Polity Press. In his book Dr. Cohen provides an analysis of what toleration is, what should be tolerated, and why toleration is important.

From the publisher:

Beginning with some key insights into what we mean by toleration, Cohen goes on to investigate what should be tolerated and why. We should not be free to do everything – murder, rape, and theft, for clear examples, should not be tolerated. But should we be free to take drugs, hire a prostitute, or kill ourselves? Should our governments outlaw such activities or tolerate them? Should they tolerate “outsourcing” of jobs or importing of goods or put embargos on other countries? Cohen examines these difficult questions, among others, and argues that we should look to principles of toleration to guide our answers. These principles tell us when limiting freedom is acceptable – that is, they indicate the proper limits of toleration. Cohen deftly explains the main principles on offer and indicates why one of these stands out from the rest.

Other recent works by Dr. Cohen include:

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New Resource: PhilPapers

The Georgia State University Library now provides access to the PhilPapers database. PhilPapers is an interactive online bibliographic index of current scholarly research for students and professional philosophers. The resource has both links to external copies of papers and local copies (normally pre-prints) of papers uploaded by the authors. It is both an index and an archive. The site was created in 2008 by David Bourget, currently at the University of Western Ontario, and David Chalmers of the Australian National University. Bourget and Chalmers serve as general editors of the project with the assistance of an advisory board and a number of subject area editors who help categorize and maintain the indexed citations.

Sponsors of the site include the the Rotman Institute of Philosophy at the University of Western Ontario, the American Philosophical Association, the Institute of Philosophy of the School of Advanced Studies at the University of London, the Centre for Consciousness of the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University, and the Joint Information Systems Committee, which supports higher education and research in the United Kingdom by providing leadership in the use of information and communications technology.

To access this database, click on the Discover tab on the Library homepage, then click on the letter “P” on the Databases by Name A-Z list and scroll down.

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Digital Humanities Discussion Group

Are you curious about Digital Humanities, but not sure exactly what that means? Would you like to gain a basic understanding of Digital Humanities, the types of tools that are used, and the types of scholarship conducted? If so, please join us for the Digital Humanities Discussion Group. For 10 weeks this summer, we’ll be working through DH101: Introduction to Digital Humanities, a course designed by UCLA students and faculty. Our first meeting is Monday, May 19th from 2:30–4:00pm in the Colloquium Room on the 8th Floor of Library South. Please register so that we’ll know you’re coming.

This discussion group is open to all interested faculty, staff, and students.

 

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Meet the Experts in Analytics for Public Finance

The newly created Center for State and Local Finance has launched a new executive education program for mid-level to senior public finance professionals in city, county and state governments. The new center is run by the public finance faculty in Georgia State University’s top-ranked Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. Let’s meet the experts for the Center’s first class, Analytics for Public Finance.

Dr. Carolyn Bourdeaux is an Associate Professor of Public Management and Policy at the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia and is Associate Director for Research at the Georgia State Fiscal Research Center.  Her recent research has focused on cutback budgeting, tax reform, intergovernmental fiscal relations as well as the legislative budget processes and decision-making.

Jessica Estep currently teaches professional writing and memo development for the Masters in Public Administration program at the Andrew Young School. She will be teaching the writing portions of the program including memo development.

Dr. Cynthia S. Searcy is Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and an Assistant Professor of Public Management and Policy, specializing in financial management and budgeting, education policy, and health policy. Dr. Searcy’s recent research investigates the financial health and financial management practices of charter schools and U.S. cities.

Dr. Katherine Willoughby seeks to promote improved budgeting and financial management practices in the public sector. Her primary focus of research is on state government budgetary and fiscal management. Her book, Policy and Politics in State Budgeting, coauthored with Dr. Kurt Thurmaier, examines the relationship between budgeting and policy development as seen through the eyes of analysts employed in executive budget offices in 11 American state governments in the South and Midwest.

Registration for Analytics for Public Finance is now open.

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Posted in Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, General News, Public Management & Policy, Publications and Research | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

Great American Songbook Vocal Competition

"If You Were Mine" sheet music (1935)

On Saturday May 10th, The Great American Songbook High School Vocal Competition and Workshop will be held on the Georgia State University campus.  This event is presented by The Michael Feinstein Great American Songbook Initiative and is dedicated solely to the music of Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, and Hollywood from the early to mid-twentieth century.  Regional finalists will spend the day in workshops with music educators and industry professionals.  The finalists will then perform a FREE concert for the public at 7:00 p.m. at the Florence Kopleff Recital Hall.

Resources in the Georgia State University Library related to the Great American Songbook:

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Posted in Books, Film & Video, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, History, Music, Primary Resources, Resources, Special Collections & Archives, Theatre | Comments Off

Author Series: The Art and Life of Atlanta Artist Wilbur G. Kurtz

The Georgia State University Emeriti Association is hosting a book talk by Dr. David O’Connell, Professor Emeritus of French, on his book The Art and Life of Atlanta Artist Wilbur G. Kurtz Thursday May 22nd, 11am to 12:30 pm, Library South 8th floor. Wilbur Kutz was selected by Margaret Mitchell as technical advisor and artistic director for Gone with the Wind and you may see his works at The Marietta Cobb Museum of Art exhibit through July 3rd, 2014.  Join author David O’Connell as he talks about the life and works of one of Georgia’s important artist-historians. This program is open to students, staff, faculty, and interested alumni, but please RSVP by Monday May 19th, 2014 to emeriti@gsu.edu or 404-413-3409.

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Posted in Art & Design, Books, Faculty Publications and Research, Film & Video, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, History, Modern & Classical Languages, Uncategorized | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Jacobs Scholarship Applications Due May 15, 2014

Jacobs speaking at the First Workmen's Circle Awards Banquet, 1969

Jacobs speaking at the First Workmen's Circle Awards Banquet, 1969

The Joseph Jacobs Labor Scholarship Fund was established in 1983 to honor Joseph Jacobs, a long-time labor attorney who represented unions in Georgia, by the Organized Labor and Workmen’s Circle Awards Committee and the North Georgia Building and Construction Trades Council.

One scholarship is awarded annually in the amount of $1,000.00. Funds will be delivered directly to the student’s Georgia State University Account in two parts: $500.00 in the fall semester and $500.00 in the spring.

The scholarship is administered by the Southern Labor Archives.

To be considered for the Jacobs Scholarship, the applicant must be admitted to or enrolled in GSU and be a student in good standing. Additionally, the applicant must also be a member of a Georgia AFL-CIO affiliate labor organization or the spouse, child, or grandchild of a member. Additionally, the applicant must submit a cover sheet, essay, and a copy of a GSU transcript, or, if not currently enrolled at GSU, a statement attesting to the fact that the student is admitted to GSU. Documents may be submitted electronically or via traditional mail by May 15, 2014. See the online application for more information.

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Summer Reading Suggestions

Last week the Law Library posted summer reading suggestions from their faculty.  We loved the idea (and suggestions) and decided to create our own list. Here are some books recommended by library employees for your summer reading enjoyment!

 

Laura Burtle
Life after Life by Kate Atkinson. This is a beautifully written, touching, and thoughtful novel where the main character lives through the first half of the 20th century over and over. The style is challenging at first, but it turns into a wonderful read. If you are ready for a true reading challenge, Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace is certainly not easy (or short) but it is an engrossing story of tennis, addiction, family, advertising, film, and more themes than I could list. It is a book that has stayed with me years after reading it.  A few years ago there was even an online book club/support group called Infinite Summer.

La Loria Konata
Running for my life: one lost boy’s journey from the killing fields of Sudan to the Olympic Games by Lopez Lomong. This is a very inspirational book that should encourage you to tackle any challenges you may be facing.

Pam Lucas
An Unnecessary Woman by Rabih Alameddine. A love letter to literature and its power to define who we are. In this portrait of a reclusive woman’s late-life crisis, you’ll follow Aaliya’s digressive mind as it ricochets across visions of past and present Beirut. Colorful musings on literature, philosophy, and art are invaded by memories of the Lebanese Civil War and Aaliya’s own volatile past. As she tries to overcome her aging body and spontaneous emotional upwellings, Aaliya is faced with an unthinkable disaster that threatens to shatter the little life she has left.

Leslie Madden
If you like smart, well written mysteries, I recommend: The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin, and The Meaning of Night: A Confession by Michael Cox

Ida Martinez
At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcon. Born in Peru, raised in Birmingham, AL, and now living in San Francisco, Alarcon’s writing star has been rising for years. This one was noted as a “best” and “favorite” book of 2013 by NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, and others. Alarcon writes male characters very well.

In this book, a young South American man is having a hard time navigating life with a girlfriend, his widowed mom, and an absent brother. He’s an actor, and gets a part in a traveling show led by aging political dissidents, who have been his heroes. In one of the small isolated towns in the mountainous terrain where they are to perform their play, something happens. Something pretty intense. And then more intense things happen. And then more… Here’s more about the book at Goodreads.

Jason Puckett
Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the prison of belief by Lawrence Wright. It’s a history of Scientology from its inception to the present. Wright spoke to current and former Scientologists and delved into the history of L. Ron Hubbard to come up with a book that’s part biography and part expose. He pays particular attention of how Scientology has come to be so influential over powerful people in Hollywood. It’s scary and fascinating stuff, and I couldn’t put it down.

Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh
Here is Where: Discovering America’s Great Forgotten History by Andrew Carroll. It’s a nice, light history lesson combined with travel log: “chronicles Andrew Carroll’s incredible journey across the United States to find unmarked locations associated with extraordinary individuals and pivotal events in our nation’s history.” (from book’s site).

He spoke last fall at the Carter Center (Pat, my spouse, and I went) – really engaging and down-to-earth guy, and it’s totally reflected in his writing. When he signed our book, I told him how when ALA was in New Orleans I went to the spot where the 30-block Storyville red-light prostitution district used to be (no historical marker) and thought, “Well, here is where… [censored]” He got a kick out of it. And, heck, if you’re interested in learning more about Storyville, there are a few books in the library on that, too.

Jaclyn Werner
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie. Fussy Belgian detective Hercule Poirot investigates the murder of a well-respected pillar of a small-town community. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd frequently tops lists of greatest mystery novels of all time–and when you reach the ending, you’ll see why.

 

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Recent Research in Criminal Justice

Dr. Joshua Hinkle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Georgia State University and an Affiliated Scholar for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University. His research focuses on issues related to the effectiveness of police tactics in reducing crime and disorder and the impact of police tactics on targeted communities. In particular, his recent research has focused on hot spots and broken windows based policing tactics and their impacts on fear of crime, collective efficacy and police legitimacy. Other recent research has included testing the broken windows theory, studies of the methodologies used to measure disorder and fear of crime and randomized experimental evaluation methodology.  Here’s some of his research in those areas:

Hinkle, J. C. (2013). The relationship between disorder, perceived risk, and collective efficacy: A look into the indirect pathways of the broken windows thesisCriminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal Of Crime, Law & Society, 26(4), 408-432.

Weisburd, D., & Hinkle, J. C. (2012). The importance of randomized experiments in
evaluating crime prevention. In Brandon C. Welsh and David P. Farrington (eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Crime Prevention  (pp. 446-465). New York: Oxford University Press.

Weisburd, D., Hinkle, J.C.,  Famega, C., & Ready, J. (2011). The possible “backfire” effects of hot spots policing: An experimental assessment of impacts on legitimacy, fear and collective efficacyJournal of Experimental Criminology, 7, 297-320.

Hinkle, J. C., & Weisburd, D. (2008). The irony of broken windows policing: A micro-place study of the relationship between disorder, focused police crackdowns and fear of crime. Journal of Criminal Justice, 36, 503-512.

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Recent Research by Gerontology Professor Morgan

GSU Gerontology Professor Jennifer Craft Morgan

GSU Gerontology Professor Jennifer Craft Morgan

Meet Professor Jennifer Craft Morgan, who joined the GSU Gerontology Institute in 2012.

According to her departmental profile, Dr. Morgan’s “research focuses on jobs and careers, attempting to understand how policy, population, workplace and individual level factors shape how work is experienced and how work is organized” and she “uses a life course perspective” in her research, “paying particular attention to issues of social stratification related to aging and gender.”  As well, she has been involved in several grant-funded research projects.

Check out some of Dr. Morgan’s recent publications:

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